• Call Us 022-28985920/ 9769713791/ 9167724446/ 9769844633
  • drsachinplastic@gmail.com

Home

Late Pregnency

Fetal Movements

Fetal movements are perceived by the women as a sensation of discrete kick, flutter, swish or roll. Movements are first perceived by the mother between 18 and 20 weeks of gestation. Women in their first pregnancy may perceive movement much later than 20 weeks of pregnancy, but women who have been pregnant before may perceive fetal movements as early as 16 weeks pregnancy in the subsequent pregnancies.

Fetal movements provide an indication of the integrity of the central nervous and musculoskeletal systems. The normal fetus is active and capable of physical movement, and goes through periods of both rest and sleep. The number of spontaneous movements tends to increase until the 32nd week of pregnancy. From this stage of gestation, the frequency of fetal movements plateaus until the onset of labor; however, the type of fetal movement may change as pregnancy advances in the third trimester. Fetal movements are usually absent during fetal ‘sleep’ cycles, which occur regularly throughout the day and night and usually last for 20–40 minutes. These sleep cycles rarely exceed 90 minutes in the normal, healthy fetus. There is some evidence that women perceive most fetal movements when lying down, fewer when sitting and fewest while standing. Sedating drugs, alcohol, cigarette smoking is associated with a decrease in fetal activity.

Women are advised to be aware of their baby’s individual pattern of movements. If at any time they feel that the movements (commonly called as the kick count) are reduced or absent then they are advised to lie on their left side and focus on fetal movements for 2 hours. If they do not feel 10 or more discrete movements in 2 hours, they should contact their doctor.

DIABETES DURING PREGNANCY

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Diabetes is a condition that results in high blood sugar (glucose) caused by the pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone that helps lower the glucose in the bloodstream by moving it inside of cells, where they use it for fuel. During pregnancy, the body becomes more resistant to the effects of insulin to help ensure there is enough glucose in the blood stream for the baby. In some women, this insulin resistance is more pronounced, resulting in higher-than-normal blood sugars during pregnancy.

Risk factors for gestational diabetes include: overweight/obesity, history of an infant weighing over 9 lbs at birth, race (African-American, Asian, Hispanic/Latina) or family history of diabetes/gestational diabetes.

After your sixth month, your doctor will perform a screen for gestational diabetes, called the one-hour glucose tolerance test. A glucose drink is given and the blood sugar level is tested exactly one hour from the time the drink is finished. If the test is abnormal, a second test is performed which is more accurate at testing for gestational diabetes.

If you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you will receive diabetes education from a nutritionist about how to check blood sugars and changing your diet to lower your blood sugar. In some cases, medication to control your blood sugar may be required. It is important to maintain good control of your blood sugars during pregnancy to avoid complications. Women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes are at increased risk for very large infants, c-section, blood pressure problems during pregnancy and problems with the baby requiring an ICU stay (such as breathing problems, jaundice or low blood sugar).

High Blood Pressure / Hypertension

Blood pressure is the pressure of the blood against the blood vessel walls each time the heart contracts (squeezes) to pump the blood through your body. High blood pressure also is called hypertension. Hypertension can lead to health problems. During pregnancy, severe or uncontrolled hypertension can cause complications for you and your baby.

Chronic Hypertension is high blood pressure that was present before you became pregnant or that occurs in the first half (before 20 weeks) of your pregnancy. If you took blood pressure medication before you became pregnant - even if your blood pressure is normal - you have chronic hypertension.

Gestational Hypertension is high blood pressure that first occurs in the second half (after 20 weeks) of pregnancy. Although gestational hypertention usually goes away after childbirth, it may increase the risk of developing hypertension in the future.

High blood pressure during pregnancy can place extra stress on your heart and kidneys and can increase your risk of heart disease, kidney disease and stroke, Other possible complications include the following:

  • Fetal growth restriction- restriction - High blood pressure can decrease the flow of nutrients to the baby through the placenta. The baby may have growth problems as a result.
  • Preeclampsia - The condition is more likely to occur in women with chronic high blood pressure than in women with normal blood pressure.
  • Preterm delivery - if the placenta is not providing enough nutrients and oxygen to your baby, it may be decided that early delivery is better for your baby than allowing pregnancy to continue.
  • Placental abruption - This condition, in which the placenta prematurely detaches from the wall of the uterus, is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.
  • Cesarean delivery - Women with hypertension are more likely to have a cesarean delivery than women with normal blood pressure. A ceserean delivery carries risks of infection, injury to internal organs and bleeding.

CORD BLOOD

Cord blood is the baby’s blood that remains in the placenta and umbilical cord after birth. Cord blood can be collected and stored for future use. Cord blood is not collected as a routine. Cord blood contains stem cells. Stem cells can grow into different kinds of cells in the body. The stem cells from the cord blood can be used for treatment of various conditions (blood diseases, leukaemia, sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia, immune diseases and metabolic diseases.) Research is on to see if stem cells can be used to cure diabetes. In cord blood transplant, stem cells replace diseased cells and grow to form the mature healthy cells that are required in the body.

Cord blood is the baby’s blood that remains in the placenta and umbilical cord after birth. Cord blood can be collected and stored for future use. Cord blood is not collected as a routine. Cord blood contains stem cells. Stem cells can grow into different kinds of cells in the body. The stem cells from the cord blood can be used for treatment of various conditions (blood diseases, leukaemia, sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia, immune diseases and metabolic diseases.) Research is on to see if stem cells can be used to cure diabetes. In cord blood transplant, stem cells replace diseased cells and grow to form the mature healthy cells that are required in the body.

Once you have decided to do cord blood banking then the company gives you a kit to carry to the hospital when you get admitted for delivery. The cord blood is collected immediately after the delivery of the baby. This process does not harm the baby or the mother. The blood is then transported to the laboratory by the personnel of the company. Once in the laboratory it is tested, processed and then cryo-preserved.

Medical Excellence
Over 10 Years of EXPERIENCE
Dedicated & Pro TREATMENT